Jute rugs are a worthy investment when you want to make a room in your home look stylish and cosy. Moreover, they are considered organic and could be quite durable, when good maintenance is provided. As it turns out, though, the latter is not so simple to achieve, especially when you are not familiar with all the specifics, regarding the rug’s fabric.

 

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What is a jute rug?

A jute rug is easy to recognise with its light brown colour and simple structure. Its name comes from the vegetable fibre that it is produced from. The plant grows in Asia, specifically in India and Bangladesh. Jute is entirely recyclable, which makes such a rug an affordable eco-friendly option for every home. The softness and low-maintenance of the jute rug could be considered additional benefits of owning such a piece.

Hessian rug and straw rug are other popular names for this specific type of rug. Although there is still a difference, as hessian is made of the skin of the plant and it’s slightly finer than jute fibre. If you value softness in a rug, then look for wool and jute rug or jute and cotton combination instead of a 100 % jute material.

How to clean your jute rug at home

Jute rugs are fairly easy to clean, requiring just a simple vacuuming once or twice per week. It is essential, though, to do it on both sides of the rug, following the weave, to eliminate trapped dust and dirt. This is applicable for regular rugs, however, in case you have a larger woven jute rug, you can just try to collect the grime underneath it.

Braided jute rugs tend to retain dirt more easily, so in addition to vacuuming, you can use a plastic spatula or toothbrush to dig out the soiling, embedded within the fibres.

When it comes to cleaning, one of the biggest concerns is whether jute rugs can get wet. Washing a jute rug is not preferable, in fact even a small amount of moisture could be damaging for the rug’s fibre, causing colour change and encouraging mould to grow.

Still, protecting your floor coverings from spills and stains constantly is impossible. Even with water out of the picture, there are ways to tackle the nasty stains and save yourself the headache.

How to clean cat/dog urine from your jute rug

Pets seem drawn to carpets and rugs when they need to “do their business” and the consequences of just one such accident can remain for months. Prevention is best, but if you are too late, then here is how best to proceed:

  • Blot the stain straight away and as much as of it as you can. Do this on both sides of the rug, as some of the liquid may have already reached the floor.
  • Sprinkle baking soda generously on top. *Liquid and gel type of cleaners are out of the question.
  • You need to leave the bicarb soda on for at least a couple of hours or even more if you can. It will absorb any remaining moisture, while also tackling the strong smell.
  • Remember to vacuum afterwards.
  • Any dry cleaning methods are welcome to try, too.

Pet urine stains are the toughest to remove whether it’s from rugs, carpets, furniture or floors. So you need to keep in mind that DIY techniques do not always bring satisfying results, even when done on time. If such methods seem risky or you don’t like the outcome of your efforts, then a professional jute rug cleaning is the best option.

What to do if there is a water stain

Water may seem less dangerous, but it could still cause darkening of the material of not just white jute rugs, but also of hessian style rugs, sisal and other delicate carpeting. If it affects the fibres, you have to hurry and get as much out of it as you can. In case the wet area has already dried and the water stain has formed on your jute rug, then you can try spraying a little bit of water and eco-friendly dishwashing liquid.

Don’t let the liquid set in, but blot with a towel and then repeat the same again. Check every time if the water stain is still visible. A specialised rug cleaning product can also be tested, but make sure to follow the instructions.

Removing red wine stains from the jute rug

Take action as soon as you notice the stain, following the steps below. 

  • Blot all that you can manage.
  • Sprinkle salt generously before the liquid spreads. The white crystals can absorb spills quite fast, but you will also need a bleaching agent to take care of the red.
  • After you vacuum the salt, look for baking soda. It is a safe natural stain remover for furniture and carpets, which can also have a bleaching effect on fabrics.
  • You need to cover the whole stain with the baking soda and leave it to work for several hours.

Hydrogen peroxide can also bleach, however, due to the sensitivity of the jute material it may not be so beneficial to use it.

There is also the alternative of mixing the baking soda with a little bit of water to form a chemical-free cleaning solution. Use a brush to work it gently into the material for maximum effect. You will probably have to repeat this a few times until the natural rug colour becomes visible. If despite your best efforts you can still see the stain, better let a professional inspect it before further treatment is applied.

Once you are done cleaning your jute rug, do your best to speed up the drying process. Take the rug outside, turn on the air conditioning, use a fan or a hairdryer on the wet areas.

Takeaways

  • Always check the label’s instructions to find out the best way to clean your jute rug.
  • Avoid liquid cleaning detergents, shampoos and the likes and stick to dry cleaning products, preferably specifically developed for jute material.
  • Water is not a friend to most natural fibres, so better forget about putting your jute rug in the washing machine.
  • Look for a jute rug protector to extend the lifespan of your beautiful piece and ease its maintenance.
  • Last update: November 1, 2019

Posted in Cleaning Guides

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